Mojo Moult: A Picture of Pinfeathers

Is he sick? Does he have scabies? Is he dying?!!

No, no, and no.

Mr. Lou is going through the most intense Mojo moult of his life right now. He has to be beyond uncomfortable, but he’s still our cheerful little Lou! Our handsome boy is not so handsome. Warning: Graphics of intense Mojo Moult beyond this point!

Louie has what hubby and I call “Birdy Zits”–in other words, tons of pin feathers on his face. When we first brought him home last year, he was deep in the throes of the dreaded Mojo. He looked sort of like a little bald old man with a bad comb over. Observe:

He had a little of that going this time, but while the feathers on the back of his head have grown in, it’s spread to his face. And cheeks. And everywhere. He’s going through a super intense moult at the same time as his Mojo moult. 😦

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Oh God. They’re EVERYWHERE.

Lou and I took a shower, and he is a spiky dinosaur bird right now. :/

The best thing for him right now is to give him a little extra protein (ekkies usually don’t need much, but he LOVES egg whites, so he’s been getting some of those daily), more of his favorite nutritious foods to make his new feathers extra shiny (celery is GREAT for that!) and daily showers.

Most of these suggestions come from the link above; the one modification I’d make to that  awesome eclectus information is this–female eclectus parrots can TOTALLY go through Mojo moults as well. As a three-year volunteer at a local bird store, I have seen this first-hand on several occasions and had it confirmed by both avian experts. It’s a thing.

So there you have it. Spiky dinosaur Louie: a pin cushion.

Has your ekkie gone through a tough Mojo moult, or has one of your flock gone through a super hard moult? Feel free to pingback with pictures!

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2 thoughts on “Mojo Moult: A Picture of Pinfeathers

    1. Pretty much. With most birds, you’ll just see some pin feathers on top of other new feathers sticking up here and there–if you see bald patches on most birds, it usually means they’re plucking them out from a specific area due to stress, illness, etc.

      With eclectus parrots, though, they’ll lose them en masse, leaving patches of skin/down feathers only until new feathers start growing. In other words, it’s highly gross and scares a ton of new eclectus owners. 😀

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